Advanced Placement (AP) and Advanced (not AP!) Electives

AP Human Geography

According to the College Board, the purpose of the AP course in Human Geography is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. To enroll in this course, students must have completed World History II with a B+ or better and have the recommendation of their World History II teacher.

AP Psychology

The Advanced Placement Program sponsored by the College Board offers an opportunity to study college level Psychology and, depending on examination results, to receive advanced placement, college credit, or both upon entering college. The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of humans. Students are exposed to the psychological research, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields within psychology. Successful students will establish deep understanding of research principles, the biological causes of behavior (the brain), learning, development, cognition, personality, abnormal behavior and its treatment according to the DSM 5, and social psychology. Rising Juniors who have distinguished themselves in U.S. History II at the honors level may enroll in AP Psychology concurrently with World History II, with a recommendation from their 10th grade teacher and the Department Chairperson. This course is not a substitute for any of the three required core courses. Students do not need to take semester Psychology prior to the full year AP course, but it can be helpful for those who have never previously attempted an advanced level course. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the AP exam. Students must have successfully completed Biology before they enroll. 11th Grade students may enroll in this course with permission of the Department Chair. This course is eligible for Dual Enrollment Credit with Middlesex Community College. A summer reading and assignment is mandatory.

AP United States History

The Advanced Placement Program sponsored by the College Board offers an opportunity to study college level U.S. History and, depending on examination results, to receive advanced placement, college credit, or both upon entering college. All of the major topics and periods of American history will be studied in depth. The course includes extensive reading, discussion, analytical papers, research assignments and book reports. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the AP exam. Rising sophomores who have distinguished themselves in US I at the Honors level may enroll in Advanced Placement United States History with the recommendation of the 9th grade instructor and permission from the Department Chair. This course may substitute the second year U.S. History requirement. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the AP exam. Rising seniors who have completed World History II and have the recommendation of their teacher may enroll in this course. A summer reading and assignment is mandatory.

AP World History

The Advanced Placement Program sponsored by the College Board offers an opportunity to study college level World History and, depending on examination results, to receive advanced placement, college credit, or both upon entering college. The course begins with ‘Foundations’, which introduces the course and focuses on setting the historical and geographical context. This part of the course introduces world historical patterns that form the basis for future developments. Five major historical periods of world history are studied thematically: 8000  B.C.E. – 600 C.E.; 600 C.E. – 1450; 1450-1750; 1750-1914; 1914 – Present. The major themes include: patterns of interaction among major societies; relationships of change and continuity across the time periods covered in the course; the impact of technology and demography on people and the environment; systems of social structure and gender structure; cultural and intellectual developments; and changes in the functions of world politics. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the AP exam. This course may substitute for the third year World History Requirement, and completion of US History I and II with the recommendation of the US II teacher are requirements for enrolling in this course. A summer reading and assignment is mandatory.

 Advanced Seminar in Social Studies

This course is the capstone of the Social Studies experience and is for students who are self-motivated, love to read, write and talk about their reading and writing. This course is a genuine seminar experience exactly like you’ll find in college. The students in the class select non-fiction books from all areas of the social sciences, read the books, discuss and write about the books and design ways to take the books’ contents into the larger community. You need to get the permission of the department chair, and you need a teacher recommendation to get into this class. You don’t need all A’s, you do need to have a passion for the social sciences and a willingness to share your opinions. Think of it as a book club on steroids, and you’ll have a good sense of what the course is like. This course is only available in the Fall Semester at the Honors level and is capped at 16 students.

Advertisements